GIP (1-30) Human amide YAEGTFISDYSIAMDKIHQQDFVNWLLAQK-amide

Description

Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is an inhibiting hormone of the secretin family of hormones. While GIP is a weak inhibitor of gastric acid secretion, its main role is to stimulate insulin secretion – in a glucose-dependent mechanism. Therefore, GIP is referred to as a glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide.
GIP is derived from a 153-amino acid pro-protein encoded by the GIP gene and circulates as a biologically active 42-amino acid peptide. It is synthesised by K cells, which are found in the mucosa of the duodenum and the jejunum of the gastrointestinal tract. GIP receptors are seven-transmembrane proteins found on beta-cells in the pancreas. These beta-cells are those that are able to simultaneously detect glucose and release insulin as a result to GIP binding.
The clinical relevance of GIP is related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); studies have found that T2DM diabetics are unresponsive to GIP and have lower levels of GIP secretion after a meal when compared to non-diabetics. In research involving knockout mice, it was found that absence of the GIP receptors correlates with resistance to obesity.
Catalogue number crb1001473
Sequence (one letter code) YAEGTFISDYSIAMDKIHQQDFVNWLLAQK-amide
Sequence (three letter code) H-Tyr-Ala-Glu-Gly-Thr-Phe-Ile-Ser-Asp-Tyr-Ser-Ile-Ala-Met-Asp-Lys-Ile-His-Gln-Gln-Asp-Phe-Val-Asn-Trp-Leu-Leu-Ala-Gln-Lys-NH2
Aliases GIP (1-30) Human
Purity >95%
Molecular Weight 3529.7
References

Graaf et al (2016) Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 and Its Class B G Protein-Coupled Receptors: A Long March to Therapeutic Successes. Pharmacol. Rev. 68(4) 954 PMID: 27630114

Manandhar and Ahn (2014) Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogs: Recent Advances, New Possibilities, and Therapeutic Implications. J. Med. Chem. 58(3) 1020 PMID: 25349901

Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is an inhibiting hormone of the secretin family of hormones. While GIP is a weak inhibitor of gastric acid secretion, its main role is to stimulate insulin secretion – in a glucose-dependent mechanism. Therefore, GIP is referred to as a glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide.
GIP is derived from a 153-amino acid pro-protein encoded by the GIP gene and circulates as a biologically active 42-amino acid peptide. It is synthesised by K cells, which are found in the mucosa of the duodenum and the jejunum of the gastrointestinal tract. GIP receptors are seven-transmembrane proteins found on beta-cells in the pancreas. These beta-cells are those that are able to simultaneously detect glucose and release insulin as a result to GIP binding.
The clinical relevance of GIP is related to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); studies have found that T2DM diabetics are unresponsive to GIP and have lower levels of GIP secretion after a meal when compared to non-diabetics. In research involving knockout mice, it was found that absence of the GIP receptors correlates with resistance to obesity.

GIP (1-30) Human amide

Cat No. Pack Size Price Qty

crb1001473h

0.5mg

$225.00